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1503 A.D. Animals & NPC's Frame Models

by Thomas on April 24, 2002 @ 1:29 p.m. PDT

Have a look at the wire frame models of some of 1503 A.D.'s NPC's. Take a sneak peek at the work of the Austrian 1503 A.D. developer team's 3D Artists! "1503 A.D. is a new progressive strategy game" Read more below to enjoy the zebras, sharks and more!
Here the wire frame model of the antelope is visible from three different perspectives: top, side and front. The model has already been shaded at upper right, i.e. the graphic artists have already assigned colors to the different surfaces. This way it's possible to estimate approximately how the antelope will appear. Its actual appearance first emerges after texturing. Here the graphic artists are using the Messiah graphic tool to animate the elephant. To aid in animation, a skeleton is constructed out of individual so-called "bones". If one of the elephant's legs moves the rest of the skeleton will now automatically adjust to the movement. Once the elephant has been animated using Messiah it is sent back to the LightWave graphics program. The skeleton is no longer there, having already served its purpose. The elephant now wanders through 1503 A.D. in 16 frames (animation steps). The giraffe's wire frame model in the LightWave graphics program's animation tool. It moves forward in 32 frames (animation steps), as can be seen in the bottom right-hand corner. Furthermore, the screenshot was taken at 9:20 a.m. :-) Here the wire frame model shows the chief on horseback from three different perspectives: top, side and front. The model has already been shaded at upper right, i.e. the graphic artists have already assigned colors to the different surfaces. This gives an idea of what the figure will look like once the textures have been applied. Here the chief has had to assume a rather strange position called a T pose. This makes it easier to generate a skeleton for animation. Here you can see the shark's shaded model in the LightWave animation tool. Shaded means that the normally colorless polygons have been assigned colors, giving an idea of what the shark will later look like. He swims through ANNO 1503's seas at an amazing 60 frames (animation steps). This screenshot shows a peacock's wire frame model from three different perspectives. The model has already been shaded at upper right, i.e. the graphic artists have already assigned colors to the different surfaces. This gives an approximate idea as to how the figure will later appear. You can see the polygon statistics in the small box in the middle of the picture. A polygon is one of the 4553 quadrilaterals making up the peacock. Here the peacock has been imported into the Messiah graphic tool for animation. The skeleton used to aid animation can be seen clearly. In this screenshot the peacock tail's main bones have been selected. When the graphic artists move these bones the rest of the skeleton responds appropriately. The shaded penguin model in the LightWave animation tool. Shaded means that the normally colorless polygons have been assigned colors, giving an idea of what it will later look like. The penguin is a modest, unassuming animal and moves in 16 frames (animation steps). Here you can the zebra's model in the LightWave graphics program's animation tool. The zebra gallops along at an amazing 60 frames (animation steps). The zebra's lighting is being adjusted in this screenshot, with a light source under the front hooves having been chosen.
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