Archives by Day

April 2014
SuMTuWThFSa
12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930

About Rainier

PC gamer, WorthPlaying EIC, globe-trotting couch potato, patriot, '80s headbanger, movie watcher, music lover, foodie and man in black -- squirrel!

Advertising





New Study Finds Chess Makes Kids Smarter

by Rainier on Aug. 21, 2012 @ 9:37 a.m. PDT

In an extensive study, the Learning to Think Project found significant gains, crossed gender and all socio-economic groups, in IQ in elementary children exposed to chess over a 4.5 month period.

Even learning disabled and hyperactive children see increased performance from learning chess. Yet shrinking school funding has required most schools to cut programs like chess. Since private tutors are rarely an option, more parents are turning to Championship Chess by DreamQuest Games. DreamCoach is like private tutor, which provides move-by-move hints and explanations. People interested in acquiring Championship Chess can get a 75% discount with coupon code CHESS_WOW

A study by New York City Schools revealed introducing children to Chess produced a number of benefits. As one would expect, it dramatically improved a child’s ability to think rationally. The study saw concrete results in higher grades, especially in English and Math studies. During the course of the study, researchers witnessed an increase of self-confidence and self-worth in children. Children who played chess applied hard work, concentration and commitment to their school studies. NYC schools found the students even benefited socially from the program. Chess helped the children make friends more easily, providing an easy, safe forum for gathering and discussion. It also allowed girls to compete with boys on a non-threatening, socially acceptable plane.

These competitive advantages provided by Chess are more important than ever. Robert M. Snyder, author of Chess for Juniors, tells parents “today the world is so technology oriented that you need brainpower, not brawn to compete.”

With a good coach and “a few months of training, any motivated and bright 10-year-old can become a proficient player.” Claims Steve Sawyer, Charter President of the Oklahoma Scholastic Chess Organization. Sawyer further explains, “skills acquired by chess are not just for extremely gifted children; they are trainable skills for all.”

blog comments powered by Disqus